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Course Introduction

Estimated Lesson Time: 30 minutes (self-evaluated option) / 1 hour (instructor-evaluated option)

This is a sample lesson or if you are a student you are not logged in. You can view the course material, but to access all the course content, interact with other students, save your progress, and earn the certificate of completion, you must register and login.

Lesson Introduction

The topics in this lesson include:

Positive humanism is not anti-religion; it is however anti-anti-humanism.

Positive humanism is not for everyone.

Positive humanism is not the same as positive psychology.

Positive humanism is not the same as humanism.

Lesson To Do List

Proceed to each section below. Click on the header bar to expand the section and follow the instructions in that section. Once complete, click on each item that you have completed.

Buy the book (or at least strongly consider it!)
View the lesson presentation
Watch each lesson video
Review the lesson key points
Match the lesson terms with their definitions
Review the discussion questions

Lesson Resources

Purchase the Book if you do not already have it. It is currently available in ebook format from all the major retailers, hard cover, and audio format.

Get the ebook: https://www.ebookit.com/books/0000003955/Positive-Humanism-A-Primer.html

Get the hard cover: http://www.amazon.com/Positive-Humanism-Primer-Bo-Bennett/dp/1456623621/

Get the audiobook from Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Positive-Humanism-A-Primer/dp/B00Q3HFPR2 (also available on iTunes)

Enrolled Student Lesson Resources

This section contains information and/or resources exclusively for enrolled students.

Lesson Presentation (00:05:03)

To Do: View all the slides in the presentation or view to the end. Be sure to click the "Next" button to advance through the slides.

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Lesson Videos

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Postitive Humanism (12/03/2014 @ Concord Humanists in MA) ()

In this presentation I go into more detail then is present in this course and cover some different topics.

Lesson Key Points

Positive humanism is an applied secular humanistic philosophy based on the scientific findings of positive psychology that focuses on personal, professional, and societal flourishing.
The philosophy is grounded in the theories of positive psychology, which is the study of the positive side of the mental health spectrum—human flourishing.
Positive humanism is not anti-religion; it is however anti-anti-humanism.
Positive humanism is not for everyone.
Positive humanism is not the same as positive psychology.
Positive humanism is not the same as humanism.

Lesson Terms and Definitions

To Do: Match the correct terms with the definition.

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a person who disbelieves or lacks belief in the existence of God or gods.
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an advocate or follower of the principles of humanism.
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a person who believes that nothing is known or can be known of the existence or nature of God or of anything beyond material phenomena; a person who claims neither faith nor disbelief in God.
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a person who believes in the existence of a god or gods; specifically in the existence of one God viewed as the creative source of the human race and the world who transcends yet is immanent in the world.
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a person who believes in the existence of a supreme being, specifically of a creator who does not intervene in the universe.
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one who opposes organized religion or the belief in any deity.

Lesson Discussion Questions

Why is a science-based philosophy important? Or is it really that important?
What are a few situations where someone might be better off with religious and/or supernatural beliefs?
Do you think there is a place for mocking religious beliefs?

Lesson Assignments

Assignment #1Answer one of the following question found in the "Lesson Discussion Questions" section using the discussion section below, and respond to/comment on at least one student's post. Comment on a post that has no comments yet, if possible.
Assignment #2:

This assignment is for students with the instructor-evaluated course option.

Were you formerly religious or are you currently religious? If so, is there any part of religious believe you have not found a good secular substitute for? What is it? For example, perhaps you can't understand why people would do good if there is no god to hold you accountable.

If you were never religious, do you feel that you can adequately explain your secular world view to a theist? Is there any part that you struggle with?

Lesson Quiz

This is a sample lesson or if you are a student you are not logged in. You can view the quiz, but you will not be able to submit your answers.

This lesson's quiz comprises 5 multiple choice questions. Choose the best answer. Achieving passing score of 80% will register this lesson as complete if you have also passed the manually-reviewed assignments. You can take the quiz as many times as you wish.

Take the Quiz for this Lesson


    From the Course:
    Personal Development
    Positive Humanism: A Quick Guide to Living the Good, Secular Life
    Bo Bennett, PhD

    (4 ratings)
    Personal Development : Religion and Spirituality
    Offered by VirversitY
    $19.95 $ 9.95
    $99.00 $59.00
    Lesson Progress
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    This lesson is not yet complete. Still left to do: Lesson Presentation, Terms and Definitions, Assignments, Quiz

    Lessons

    Lessons greyed out are for enrolled students only.

    #2: Positive Humanism 2.0: Living the Good, Secular Life
    #3: The Morality of Positive Humanism
    #4: Religion: A Middleman to Well-Being
    #5: Making Sense of Reason
    #6: Exploring the “F” Word: Freewill
    #7: “Balance” Does Not Have To Mean Being Irrational
    #8: On Dying and Living
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    Lesson Quiz

    Be sure to click the "Submit Quiz Answers" at the end of the quiz to save and submit your quiz answers. Select the best answer.

    1) Positive humanism is
    a) a theoretical secular humanistic philosophy based on the scientific findings of positive psychology that focuses on personal, professional, and societal flourishing
    b) an applied spiritual humanistic philosophy based on the scientific findings of positive psychology that focuses on personal, professional, and societal flourishing
    c) an applied secular humanistic philosophy based on the scientific findings of positive psychology that focuses on personal, professional, and societal flourishing
    d) a religious philosophy based on the spiritual findings of positive psychology that focuses on personal, professional, and societal flourishing
    2) Positive humanism is anti-religion.
    a) true
    b) false
    3) As a positive humanist, you should abstain from all arguments against all aspects of religious belief
    a) true
    b) false
    4) Why isn't positive humanism is for everyone?
    a) people from very religious families or communities can be ostracized by intolerant family members and friends, lowering their well-being significantly
    b) not everyone can afford it
    c) not everyone is smart enough
    d) it is for everyone
    5) Positive humanism is not the same as positive psychology because
    a) there are parts of positive psychology that conflict with humanistic values
    b) positive psychology fails to “secularize” the well-being benefits that arise from religious and spiritual practices
    c) the strong focus on person agency leads to a “blame the victim” mentality
    d) all of the above
    submitting answers...

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